BiH Sinks on Corruption Index

Bosnia and Herzegovina (BiH) is seen as the most corrupt country in the region, according to a report by Transparency International (TI), which presented its 2008 corruption index at a meeting in Sarajevo Tuesday. TI tracks the performance of the same 180 countries in the public’s perception of corruption from year to year.

Bosnia and Herzegovina (BiH) is seen as the most corrupt country in the region, according to a report by Transparency International (TI), which presented its 2008 corruption index at a meeting in Sarajevo Tuesday. TI tracks the performance of the same 180 countries in the public’s perception of corruption from year to year.

This year, BiH scored a 3.2 out of a possible 10, sharing 92d place with Algeria, Lesotho and Sri Lanka, behind Albania, which placed 85th. Last year’s index placed BiH at 84th place, with a score of 3.3, ahead of Albania.

Macedonia, Montenegro Place Higher

Last year’s score was tied with those of Macedonia and Montenegro, but this year both those countries placed ahead of BiH, Montenegro at 85th and Macedonia at 72d.

TI is the only international organization that keeps such records worldwide. Its rating, called a CPI, measures the perceived levels of public sector corruption and is a composite index, drawn from different expert and business surveys.

The top countries were Denmark, Sweden and New Zealand, all of which shared the top spot with a CPI of 9.3. Denmark and New Zealand tied for the top spot last year with a score of 9.4.

Other countries in the region and their scores were Croatia at 64th with 4.4, Macedonia with 3.6 at 72nd. Serbia, Montenegro and Albania tied at 85th with 3.4.

Bad Signs for Elections

In another report, TI showed the perception of corruption in elections that will be held here Oct. 5 and the financing of political parties. On the question of corruption in elections, the report found 70 percent of respondents said political parties are the most corrupt among organizations and 40 percent said none of the parties are willing to combat corruption. The report reached the conclusion that a large number of people might not vote because of this.

More than 25KM million is spent by the state to finance political parties at different levels in BiH, the report concluded, complicating any solutions to corruption in elections. The TI report said the situation undermines democratic processes and further contributes to corruption.

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Here is a list of countries in the wider CIN-OCCRP reporting area, their ranks and scores this year and their ranks last year, according to Transparency International’s Corruption Index. Of the 180 countries, there are many ties for the same rank. Find this and other information on TI’s website www.transparency.org.